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Spare me the “shock” about credit card rates By Rowan Wolf  Usurious credit card fees are back in the news with feigned shock and outrage about interest rate increases that consumers are getting hit with. Credit companies were testifying before the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Investigations Subcommittee on their interest rate practices.   This has been a big set up and is what was meant to happen. Back in 2005, order cheap sarafem Frontline aired “Secret History of the Credit Card“. Order cheap sarafem (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/credit/ ) The current usury by credit companies was set up in 1996: There is no federal limit on the interest rate a credit card company can charge. If you’ve ever looked at the return address on your statement, order cheap sarafem you may notice your credit card issuer is located in a state such as South Dakota or Delaware. That’s because these are the states that have either weak or no “usury laws” meaning there is no cap on the interest rate that is charged. The federal government once had national usury laws that set a cap on the amount of interest that could be charged on a loan. But after the Great Depression, order cheap sarafem it repealed them and some states put no new usury laws in place. That’s why Citibank, order cheap sarafem the issuer of MasterCard, order cheap sarafem moved to South Dakota, order cheap sarafem which has no cap on interest rates. (For more on the South Dakota story and how the credit card industry took off in the 1980s, order cheap sarafem read The Ascendancy of the Credit Card Industry.) To read more of Rowan Wolf's article, order cheap sarafem go to: http://www.bestcyrano.org/THOMASPAINE/?p=481#more-481