Skin Health

When politics and tennis meet.... Skin health politically incorrect or acts of conviction? Politics and sports have often mixed, skin health in a somewhat controversial cocktail--think Mohammed Ali. But athletes are also private citizens, skin health passionate about their beliefs and entitled to their opinions. Skin health And some tennis players are opening up and making their opinions heard, skin health while other issues play themselves out on the court. Here in the States, skin health James Blake has been a fan of Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama, skin health reading one of the Illinois Senator’s books, skin health “Dreams from My Father.” On the international front, skin health just recently Novak Djokovic, skin health now a hero in his native Serbia, skin health attended a rally in Belgrade, skin health where he made a speech against Kosovo’s declaration of independence from Serbia. Skin health He also appeared on a television program, skin health where he mentioned his disapproval of the state’s attempted dissolution from Serbia, skin health itself a republic of the former Yugoslavia. "Kosovo is part of Serbia. Skin health It’s part of our country... Skin health I know the [history] but I don’t want to talk about that. Skin health It was Serbian. Skin health And for me it is Serbian, skin health and always will be, skin health" he said in Dubai last week. Skin health "My father came from there. Skin health My uncle and most of my family lived there for a long time. Skin health I have been there many times." While some players, skin health such as Justine Henin, skin health have made statements that sports and politics should not mix, skin health Djokovic highlighted the importance of being involved. "I wasn’t interested in politics but this is not only politics, skin health this is something really serious." While drawing some controversy, skin health Djokovic’s comments did not draw as much backlash as those of Marcos Baghdatis earlier this year. After a video of Baghdatis chanting anti-Turkish sentiments at a barbeque held by the Hellas Fan Club, skin health a political group, skin health surfaced on the internet during the Australian Open in January, skin health Baghdatis came under fire. Skin health Though he refused to apologize, skin health he did issue a statement defending his views. “In that video from 2007 I was supporting the interest of my country, skin health Cyprus, skin health while protesting against a situation that is not recognized by the United Nations, skin health” referring to the Turkish minority who occupy a part of northern Cyprus, skin health but lack true political autonomy, skin health due to a vote against the proposition by Greek-Cypriots in a 2004 referendum. “Now I would like to concentrate on the tournament and ask everyone to respect that. Skin health I love the Australian Open and want to do well here, skin health" he concluded. But while it appears at times that the world is growing apart rather than closer together, skin health there are a few rainbows in the sky. Skin health In February, skin health Shahar Peer became the first Israeli athlete to compete in a sanctioned event in Qatar, skin health a Muslim country in the Persian Gulf. Skin health Israelis previously had visa issues when attempting to enter certain Middle Eastern countries, skin health a reflection of the region's continuing conflict between Israel and Palestine, skin health but Peer received a warm reception. Sania Mirza, skin health a Muslim, skin health partnered with Peer last year in doubles events, skin health just as Israeli Amir Hadad and Pakistani Aisam-Ul-Haq Qureshi paired up at Wimbledon in 2002, skin health a first at the time. Skin health The duo earned the ATP's Arthur Ashe Humanitarian Award for promoting "tolerance through tennis" in February 2003. While the debate continues on where and when politics and sports should mix—if at all—tennis remains an international sport and thus, skin health while the lines on the court are clearly called, skin health the political and personal lines will continue to blur. http://www.tennis.com/backcourt/general/backcourt.aspx?id=122346